skin-on-frame Ness yawl--picture!

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skin-on-frame Ness yawl--picture!

Postby James McMullen » Fri Mar 31, 2006 12:44 am

This is a picture of Angyapik, a skin-on-frame umiak that I built to the same overall shape and dimensions as a Ness Yawl back at the turn of the century. . . about six years ago. The frame is made mostly of fir and cedar with steam-bent yellow cedar ribs and was lashed together in traditional skin boat fashion. The skin is a nylon canvas and is very translucent as you can see. It is pretty mesmerising to watch the water gurgle past right through the side of the hull. I used the exact same rig as the Ness Yawl, but I substituted a daggerboard for the centerboard as the smaller opening was more compatible with the structure of the umiak.

This boat has most of the same great handling and sailing characteristics as my old Ness Yawl--and is even easier to handle out of the water as the whole thing only weighs maybe 300 lbs empty. A successful boat--though for where I now mostly sail I've decided I prefer the safer qualities of built-in flotation compartments in a glued lapstrake one, and so I am building the J-II as her replacement.
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Last edited by James McMullen on Fri Apr 14, 2006 8:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Garth » Fri Mar 31, 2006 8:07 pm

James,

That's totally cool. I think I agree on floation, etc. My Ness Yawl is nearly finished - I hope to have it in the water in the next 3-4 weeks!

Did Agnyapik really weigh 300 lbs.? I don't think my NY, complete with decks, is going to weigh much more than 400 lb. (that's a guess, though, since I haven't weighed it).

Cheers,
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Postby James McMullen » Tue Apr 04, 2006 1:02 am

Yes, about 300 pounds empty weight plus or minus a few depending on how wet and soaked up the frame members are. I just picked up half of Rowan while a buddy picked up the other end and we are both guessing an empty weight of the stretched J-II to be between 350-400 lbs or so--I'll get a better idea when we get her up on a trailer and I can take her through the truck scales. The glued lapstrake boat is significantly heavier than the skin boat at any rate.
I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing--I always thought that Angyapik was less flightly and unpredictable when she was well loaded down. I am aiming for a higher level of seaworthiness in Rowan to make her more comfortable in the bigger water where I now regularly sail.
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Postby James McMullen » Sun Jul 16, 2006 11:57 am

Now that I've launched Rowan I can tell you how these two boats compare to each other--actually they are relatively similar in performance under sail in light airs. The flexibility of the skin boat starts to become a liability for harnessing the full power of the gusts as the wind starts to kick up over 10 knots. Angyapik is happily under control, but her flexibility makes her spill wind and absorb some of the energy that could otherwise get her to surge forward.

Rowan really starts to strut her stuff in winds of 10-15 kts, when she will joyously charge along under full sail at hullspeed. Over 15 kts I put in the first reef. Angyapik wanted reefing a little earlier, as you could see the whole boat twisting under the strain of the mast--again, not a structural problem necessarily as skin boats are designed to flex, but certainly not as fast as a boat you can hold upright by hiking out.

The bouyancy compartments in Rowan are a huge bonus--not only do I feel safer from a potential swamping, but also I can stash all the little clutter items like sunscreen bottles, sunglasses case, windbreaker, lunch bag, cell phone. . .in a hatch where they won't be underfoot, get splashed, or fall overboard. The centerboard is more convenient than the daggerboard as it stows in its own case--I had to find a place to stow the daggerboard when it wasn't deployed and also carry a DB case plug to keep water from splashing up and getting me bum wet when rowing. The CNC cut foils of my new centerboard and rudder are also clearly a superior shape than my old hand-cut ones in Angyapik. I am very pleased with Rowan's windward ability. It is noticeably better at pointing than Angyapik or Dragonfly (the old Ness Yawl) is. I am going to make a new set of CNC cut foils for Dragonfly as an X-mas present for my brother--but not before I've whomped him a few times first racing him this summer.

For the moment, I am keeping Angyapik around as a secondary sailboat in case I have more friends show up who want to go cruising in open boats than I have room for on Rowan. She was so inexpensive to build (maybe $1500 including sails 6 years ago?) that I can't afford not to keep her--unless someone offers cash maybe. . .

I like Rowan better. . .but I still like Angyapik plenty.
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